The Enzo Ferrari, also known as the Type F140, is a 12-cylinder mid-engine sports automobile named after Enzo Ferrari, the company’s founder. It was developed in 2002 using Formula One technologies, such as a carbon-fiber body and an automatic shift manual transmission comparable to the F1. Carbon fiber reinforces ceramic-composite disc brakes.

Active aerodynamics and traction control are also used, which are not permitted in F1. The Enzo Ferrari’s front under-body flaps, tiny movable rear spoiler, and rear diffuser work together to generate significant downforce.

The Enzo’s F140 B V12 engine was the first of a new generation for Ferrari. The V8 engine shares the same basic design as the Maserati Quattroporte.

Enzo Car Design

The Enzo was designed by Ken Okuyama, then-head of design at Pininfarina, and debuted at the 2002 Paris Motor Show with a reported limited production run of 399 vehicles and a $659,330 price tag. The invitations were addressed to current customers, specifically those who had already purchased the F40 and F50. All 399 cars were sold in this fashion before production began.

The F140B V12 engine

The Enzo’s engine is longitudinally positioned, and the vehicle has a rear mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout. The car is powered by a Ferrari F140B 65° V12 engine with DOHC 4 valves per cylinder, variable valve timing, and Bosch Motronic ME7 fuel injection.

Enzo Ferrari the Man

Enzo Ferrari lived a comfortable life before going on a successful racing career. He also founded and ran one of the most successful racing championship teams in history, as well as one of the world’s most well-known sports car companies.

The formal name of Enzo Anselmo is Enzo Anselmo. Giuseppe Maria Ferrari was born in 1889 in Modena, Italy, and got little formal education. When he was eleven years old, he was motivated to become a racing driver after watching Felice Nazzaro’s triumph at the 1908 Circuito di Bologna.

Ferrari also hoped to be an opera singer, but the flu deaths of his father and brother in 1916 pushed him to mature quickly, and he left out of school to serve as an instructor for Modena’s fire department workshop.

Enzo served in the Italian Army’s 3rd Mountain Artillery Regiment during World War I. He became critically ill during the 1918 flu pandemic and was discharged from the Italian Army.

In 1920, Enzo joined Alfa Romeo’s racing department as a driver, and in 1923, he won his first Grand Prix at Ravenna on the Savio circuit.

After the birth of his son Alfredo (Dino) in 1932, Ferrari elected to retire from racing and focus on the management and development of Alfa race cars, establishing a race team of superstar drivers. This team was known as Scuderia Ferrari (founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1929) and functioned as Alfa Romeo’s racing division. The prancing horse emblem began to emerge on his team’s vehicles about this period.

In his later years, Enzo Ferrari technically stepped down as president in 1977, yet he kept actual corporation control. On August 14, 1988, Ferrari died in Maranello, shortly after receiving an honorary degree in physics from the University of Modena. During his career, his cars won around 4,000 races and 13 world championships. In recognition of his accomplishments, he was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1994.

Suspension, gearbox, and brakes

The Ferrari Enzo is equipped with the F1 transmission and a gear shift indicator on the steering wheel to indicate when to shift gears. The Enzo has an automated sequential manual transmission (also known as the F1 gearbox), which uses paddle-shifters to manage an electrohydraulic clutch and shifting mechanism. When it is time to swap gears, LED lights on the steering wheel to warn the driver.

The gearbox has a shift time of only 150 milliseconds. The transmission was a first-generation “clutchless” design from the late 1990s that panned for its abrupt shifting. The Enzo features four-wheel independent suspension, push-rod operated shock absorbers that can be adjusted from the cabin, and front and rear anti-roll bars.

The Ferrari Enzo was the company’s first road car to use carbon-ceramic braking discs.

The Enzo is fitted with 15-inch Brembo disc brakes and rides on 19-inch wheels. The wheels are held on by a single lug nut and have Bridgestone Potenza Scuderia RE050A tires.

Ferrari’s Prancing Horse emblem is a symbol of automotive elegance and raw Italian horsepower. During World War I, the prancing stallion came from Count Francesco Baracca, a renowned Italian air force pilot. His plane had that same design printed on its side. Baracca, considered a national hero by Italians, had nearly three dozen dogfight victories before being shot down on June 19, 1918.

It wasn’t until 1923 that Enzo Ferrari met Baracca’s mother and father, who asked Ferrari to use their son’s design on his cars for good luck. The emblem’s yellow background symbolizes the color of the Italian city Modena, Italy, where Enzo was born. The two letters accompanying the horse–S and F–stand for Scuderia Ferrari, the name of the brand’s racing division. Stripes on the top of the logo in red, white, and green represent the Italian national colors.

The horse shield subsequently evolved, and in 1947 on Ferrari’s first production car, the 125 S, the Ferrari logo and brand we know today were born.

Commendations

In 2004, the Enzo Ferrari finished third on Sports Car International’s list of the Top Sports Cars of the 2000s. The American publication Motor Trend Classic placed the Enzo fourth among the ten “Greatest Ferraris of All Time.”

Bloomberg Businessweek called the Enzo Ferrari one of the “Fifty Ugliest Cars of the Past 50 Years,” criticizing its excessive curves and angles, as well as its flashy V-shaped hood scooped-out doors and bulbous windscreen.

Ferrari’s Prancing Horse emblem is a symbol of automotive elegance and raw Italian horsepower. During World War I, the prancing stallion came from Count Francesco Baracca, a renowned Italian air force pilot. His plane had that same design printed on its side. Baracca, considered a national hero by Italians, had nearly three dozen dogfight victories before being shot down on June 19, 1918.