The ENZO Ferrari

Ferrari's Prancing Horse emblem is a symbol of automotive elegance and raw Italian horsepower. During World War I, the prancing stallion came from Count Francesco Baracca, a renowned Italian air force pilot. His plane had that same design printed on its side. Baracca, considered a national hero by Italians, had nearly three dozen dogfight victories before being shot down on June 19, 1918.

It wasn't until 1923 that Enzo Ferrari met Baracca's mother and father, who asked Ferrari to use their son's design on his cars for good luck. The emblem's yellow background symbolizes the color of the Italian city Modena, Italy, where Enzo was born. The two letters accompanying the horse–S and F–stand for Scuderia Ferrari, the name of the brand's racing division. Stripes on the top of the logo in red, white, and green represent the Italian national colors.

The horse shield subsequently evolved, and in 1947 on Ferrari's first production car, the 125 S, the Ferrari logo and brand we know today were born.

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Ferrari's Prancing Horse emblem is a symbol of automotive elegance and raw Italian horsepower. During World War I, the prancing stallion came from Count Francesco Baracca, a renowned Italian air force pilot. His plane had that same design printed on its side. Baracca, considered a national hero by Italians, had nearly three dozen dogfight victories before being shot down on June 19, 1918.

It wasn't until 1923 that Enzo Ferrari met Baracca's mother and father, who asked Ferrari to use their son's design on his cars for good luck. The emblem's yellow background symbolizes the color of the Italian city Modena, Italy, where Enzo was born. The two letters accompanying the horse–S and F–stand for Scuderia Ferrari, the name of the brand's racing division. Stripes on the top of the logo in red, white, and green represent the Italian national colors.

The horse shield subsequently evolved, and in 1947 on Ferrari's first production car, the 125 S, the Ferrari logo and brand we know today were born.

The ENZO Ferrari

Ferrari's Prancing Horse emblem is a symbol of automotive elegance and raw Italian horsepower. During World War I, the prancing stallion came from Count Francesco Baracca, a renowned Italian air force pilot. His plane had that same design printed on its side. Baracca, considered a national hero by Italians, had nearly three dozen dogfight victories before being shot down on June 19, 1918.

It wasn't until 1923 that Enzo Ferrari met Baracca's mother and father, who asked Ferrari to use their son's design on his cars for good luck. The emblem's yellow background symbolizes the color of the Italian city Modena, Italy, where Enzo was born. The two letters accompanying the horse–S and F–stand for Scuderia Ferrari, the name of the brand's racing division. Stripes on the top of the logo in red, white, and green represent the Italian national colors.

The horse shield subsequently evolved, and in 1947 on Ferrari's first production car, the 125 S, the Ferrari logo and brand we know today were born.

The ENZO Ferrari